Nodding very much about this. Some great comments in the thread too.

“Because in 10 years nothing you built today that depends on JS for the content will be available, visible, or archived anywhere on the web.

All your fancy front-end-JS-required frameworks are dead to history, a mere evolutionary blip in web app development practices. Perhaps they provided interesting ephemeral prototypes, nothing more.”

// cc @root and @digiterate_dingo ‘cos of recent convo :-)

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=25813836


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Heya everyone, I currently planning to work on a website/web application for a project. It would have client accounts, a UI/UX for selling digital content that would stay on that website.

I have a little experience but was wondering if there suggestions in terms of way to go, frameworks, how to make it lightweight, easy to maintain, and DRM friendly ?

Also, any advice, links on how-to’s, etc ?

Over the past few years, articles and blog posts have started to ask some version of the same question: “Why are all websites starting to look the same?”

These posts usually point out some common design elements, from large images with superimposed text, to hamburger menus, which are those three horizontal lines that, when clicked, reveal a list of page options to choose from.

My colleagues Bardia Doosti, David Crandall, Norman Su and I were studying the history of the web when we started to notice these posts cropping up. None of the authors had done any sort of empirical study, though. It was more of a hunch they had. So we decided to investigate the claim to see if there was any truth to the notion that websites are starting to look the same and, if so, explore why this has been happening. We ran a series of data mining studies that scrutinized nearly 200,000 images across 10,000 websites.

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“The best tool is no tool, the best build step is no build step, the best update is no update. HTML gives us all that, and more.”

https://blog.steren.fr/2020/my-stack-will-outlive-yours/

On the modern web, everything must be encrypted. Unencrypted websites are treated as relics of the past with browsers declaring them toxic waste not to be touched (or even looked at) and search engines de-prioritizing their content.

While this push for security is good for protecting modern communication, there is a whole web full of information and services that don’t need to be secured and those trying to access them from older vintage computers or even through modern embedded devices are increasingly being left behind.

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@petrichor shared their post

The Library of Babel contains every possible combination of the alphabet in 1,312,000 characters, including lower case letters, space, comma, and period. Thus, it contains every book that ever has been written, and every book that ever could be - including every play, every song, every scientific paper, every legal decision, every constitution, every piece of scripture, and so on.

Any text you find in any location of the library will be in the same place in perpetuity. We do not simply generate and store books as they are requested - in fact, the storage demands would make that impossible. Every possible permutation of letters is accessible at this very moment in one of the library’s books, only awaiting its discovery.

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The web is thirty years old, counting from the date the first web server was launched in December 1990. I first saw it emerge on August 6th, 1991, when the web was publicly announced. But after 30 years, I think we’ve lost sight of its original purpose. Here’s what I mean.

In 1991 I was writing for NeXTWORLD magazine, which was a lot of fun because I got to work with, and write about, people who were doing fascinating things with computer technology. Working for NeXTWORLD led to writing the book Taking the Next Step and a short stint at Steve Jobs’s NeXT as a technical writer…

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Created on Oct 26, 2020
By @root
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