@root shared a post by @johntitor

Enter my venerable Holden VZ Ute daily driver. From the factory, it came with a rubbish four-speed automatic gearbox. During 18 months of ownership, I destroyed four gearboxes. I could not afford a new vehicle at the time, so I had to get creative. I purchased a rock-solid, bulletproof, six-speed automatic gearbox from another car. But that’s where the solutions ended. To make it work, I had to build my own circuit board, computer system, and firmware to control the solenoids, hydraulics, and clutches inside the gearbox, handle user input, perform shifting decisions, and interface to my car by pretending to be the four-speed automatic.

I’m quite proud of my solution. It can perform a shift in 250 milliseconds, which is great for racing. It has a steep first gear, giving it a swift takeoff. It has given some more powerful cars a run for their money. It’s got flappy paddles, diagnostic data on the screen, and the ability to go ahead and change the way it works whenever I want.

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Dec 20, 2020

While exploring D recently, I remembered a game I played while at university 15 years ago. For a long time, I couldn’t remember the name at all, only that it was from a Japanese developer. After some search wrangling, I finally managed to find the name of the game: Torus Trooper!

The D Programming Language

D is a general-purpose programming language with static typing, systems-level access, and C-like syntax. With the D Programming Language, write fast, read fast, and run fast.

Created on Nov 13, 2020
By @root