Seirdy
@Seirdy

Website: https://seirdy.one Profile: https://seirdy.one/about.html

Gemini: gemini://seirdy.one/

Joined January 2021

New blog post: “Misinformation about Permissions Policy and FLoC”.

Lots of people have been spreading the often-unnecessary advice to add a Permissions-Policy response header to their sites, and some have been going so far as to ask FLOSS maintainers to patch their software to make this the default.

If you read the actual proposals and W3C specs, you’ll find a different story.

Everybody: please calm down, take a deep breath, and read before you make such prescriptive advice.

FLoC is terrible, but telling everyone to add a magic “opt-out header” in every situation conveys a misunderstanding of everything you need to know about the opt-in/out process. Google’s war against its own users doesn’t justify this kind of fearmongering.

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Seirdy commented on a post by @linuxgirl Apr 7

I wrote about the same topic: https://gurlic.com/Seirdy/series/free-platforms

The second in the series agrees with ddevault’s conclusions about Matrix but goes into some more detail about it.

As you’re surely aware, Signal has officially jumped the shark with the introduction of cryptocurrency to their chat app. Back in 2018, I wrote about my concerns with Signal, and those concerns were unfortunately validated by this week’s announcement. Moxie’s insistence on centralized ownership, governance, and servers for Signal puts him in a position of power which is easily, and inevitably, abused. In that 2018 article, and in articles since, I have spoken about the important of federation to address these problems. In addition to federation, what else does a chat app need?

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I thought I could document our non-technical aspects, and invite folks to join based on these aspects. This new goal is its own difficult moebius strip, though, because our culture is technical. Dev discussions and tutorials are an essential part of our community, and should not be obscured or downplayed.

This is a cursory review of all the indexing search engines I have been able to find.

The three dominant English search engines with their own indexes1 are Google, Bing, and Yandex (GBY). Many alternatives to GBY exist, but almost none of them have their own results; instead, they just source their results from GBY.

With that in mind, I decided to test and catalog all the different indexing search engines I could find. I prioritized breadth over depth, and encourage readers to try the engines out themselves if they’d like more information.

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Indieweb features

Would love to see Gurlic get some IndieWeb features. Two IndieWeb features in particular:

1. Webmentions. Sites like https://lobste.rs already send these. The central idea behind Webmentions is to use “linkbacks” as a comment-section.

Say I write a post. A response-blog-post, lobste.rs thread, or Gurlic post/comment that links to my post can serve as a “comment”. These “comments” (sources) containing a link back to my post (destination) send a Webmention to my Webmention endpoint, possibly like this:

curl -i -d source=https://link-to.source -d target=link-to.dest https://seirdy.one/webmentions/receive

My webmention endpoint then parses the source link’s content to make sure it contains a backlink, and my CMS, SSG, etc. can then display the mention at the bottom of my article. It could render as a plain link, a comment, or a “like” depending on the markup.

2. Some basic markup (microformats2) to make Webmention-parsing easier.

I can help out with these two features once Hummingbard/Gurlic is open-sourced.

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Feb 28 • Updated on February 28, 2021 6:36 am • Edit History (1)

Indieweb features

Would love to see Gurlic get some IndieWeb features. Two IndieWeb features in particular:

1. Webmentions. Sites like https://lobste.rs already send these. The central idea behind Webmentions is to use “linkbacks” as a comment-section.

Say I write a post. A response-blog-post, lobste.rs thread, or Gurlic post/comment that links to my post can serve as a “comment”. These “comments” (sources) containing a link back to my post (destination) send a Webmention to my Webmention endpoint, possibly like this:

curl -i -d source=https://link-to.source -d target=link-to.dest https://seirdy.one/webmentions/receive

My webmention endpoint then parses the source link’s content to make sure it contains a backlink, and my CMS, SSG, etc. can then display the mention at the bottom of my article. It could render as a plain link, a comment, or a “like” depending on the markup.

2. Some basic markup (microformats2) to make Webmention-parsing easier.

I can help out with these two features once Hummingbard/Gurlic is open-sourced.

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Seirdy commented on a post by @root Feb 28

I noticed that Gurlic doesn’t seem to be mentioned on Hummingbard’s site. Any reason why? I was under the understanding that Gurlic is supposed to become the “flagship” hummingbard instance.

I’m not complaining; I’d rather not see Gurlic get like 10000 new users and become the equivalent of Mastodon’s mastodon.social or mastodon.online, or Matrix’s matrix.org.

Looong day. Gurlic has been a bit slow these past weeks as Hummingbard development continues in full force.

Seirdy commented on a post by @StallmanWasRight Feb 24

It’s almost as if serving investors instead of users creates a conflict of interest or something.

Mindlessly chasing “growth” is possibly the leading cause of user domestication.

A war against general-purpose computing rages. On one side are the lords of technology: Google, Apple, Microsoft, their allies, and the unseen ones who control them. The lords of technology fight for money above all else, while their unseen masters fight for power. In a never ending quest to maximize their wealth and power, they are determined to control every computer in the known universe. Opposing them are the few who see the war clearly. The rebels fight to keep general-purpose computing alive. They fight for online privacy and free speech and the tools that make them possible. They fight for computers, operating systems, and software that can be used both on and off line, beyond the all-seeing eyes of the lords of technology and their masters. They fight for continued access to their computers’ file systems. They fight for control of the data on their hard drives. They fight for general-purpose hardware and programs like Handbrake and Kodi that give them the power to listen to music and watch movies that they already own, without having to buy them again and again from the likes of Apple and Amazon each time hardware standards, file formats, or delivery methods change. They fight for continued access to decentralized networks like ZeroNet, IPFS, and I2P, the last strongholds of free speech on the Internet.

Between the two opposing forces are the non-technical masses. These are the online serfs who are completely unaware and will never become aware that their freedom and their money is being stolen by their masters, the lords of technology, who they serve unwittingly with their data and monthly fees. These are the instant messaging and cat video addicts whose only concern is that computers be easy enough for toddlers to use. These are the techno-toddlers who refuse to grow up…

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This post is part of Free Platforms .

The price of freedom is eternal vigilance; in addition to settling on the right platform, we must ensure that it honors its users in both the present and the future. Keeping a platform FOSS and simple is more straightforward than keeping a platform “open”.

How do we keep an open platform from becoming a closed platform in the future?

Seirdy commented on a post by @linuxgirl Feb 7

Relevant: https://floating-point-gui.de/

If you use JSON anywhere, I want you to try something. Pop open the developer tools in your web browser and ask it to tell you what the result of ‘Math.pow(2,60)’ is. Just stuff that there and look at what you get back. It’s a big number, right?

Now, using any other reference source, look up what 2 to the power of 60 is (hint: Wikipedia “power of two” if your Google search only gives you scientific notation). Compare it to what you got from your browser.

What did you find? I assume if you didn’t notice the “000” on the end of what your web browser told you before, you will now.

Feel free to try this with other large numbers. You should find that anything above 2^53 starts getting squirrelly.

Exactly WHY this happens is not important for this specific post - floating point, mantissa, yadda yadda. I’ve covered it elsewhere, but I don’t think people really appreciated it for the problem that it is. This method of approaching it should get the general concept around to a wider audience, or at least, I hope it will.

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@Seirdy shared their post to @technology

I have never used WhatsApp, and never will. Despite this, I still feel the need to write an article about WhatsApp since it’s the perfect case study to help understand a class of businesses models I call “user domestication”. The domestication of users is high on my list of problems plaguing the human race, and is worth a detailed explanation.

Seirdy commented on a post by @StallmanWasRight Jan 28

Thing is, since the content is e2ee, you won’t get people sharing content posted to Signal to make it banworthy. It’s a messenger, not social media.

Here we go. The wheels are in motion. We’re going to see a lot more press targeted at Telegram and Signal in the near future, until their eventual ban from app stores.

Seirdy commented on a post by @haxor Jan 17

(first post!)

I’ve since made a major correction to the “Quantifying password stre

This is a tale of the intersection between thermal physics, cosmology, and a tiny amount of computer science to answer a seemingly innocuous question: “How strong does a password need to be for it to be physically impossible to brute-force, ever?”