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Italian Woman And Her Daughter (C. 1824) Joseph Severn

Italian Woman And Her Daughter (1831) Joseph Severn

Cucculelli Shaheen, “Beautiful Beasts” collection

@rish shared their post to @India

BHIM app has now Aadhar OTP based feature to create and reset UPI pin

Verse of the Day: Eternal Life - John 17:3

And this is the way to have eternal life—to know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, the one you sent to earth.

In 185 AD, Chinese astronomers recorded the appearance of a new star in the Nanmen asterism. That part of the sky is identified with Alpha and Beta Centauri on modern star charts. The new star was visible for months and is thought to be the earliest recorded supernova. This deep image shows emission nebula RCW 86, understood to be the remnant of that stellar explosion. The narrowband data trace gas ionized by the still expanding shock wave. Space-based images indicate an abundance of the element iron and lack of a neutron star or pulsar in the remnant, suggesting that the original supernova was Type Ia. Unlike the core collapse supernova explosion of a massive star, a Type Ia supernova is a thermonuclear detonation on a a white dwarf star that accretes material from a companion in a binary star system. Near the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and larger than a full moon on the sky this supernova remnant is too faint to be seen by eye though. RCW 86 is some 8,000 light-years distant and around 100 light-years across.

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L’Américaine Doit Être Plus Grande, Louis Soutter

The Fountain, Villa Torlonia Frascati, Italy (1907) John Singer Sargent

“Day by day I am approaching the goal which I apprehend but cannot describe,” Ludwig van Beethoven (December 16, 1770–March 26, 1827) wrote to his boyhood friend, rallying his own resilience as he began losing his hearing. A year later, shortly after completing his Second Symphony, he sent his brothers a stunning letter about the joy of suffering overcome, in which he resolved:

Ah! how could I possibly quit the world before bringing forth all that I felt it was my vocation to produce?

That year, he began — though he did not yet know it, as we never do — the long gestation of what would become not only his greatest creative and spiritual triumph, not only a turning point in the history of music that revolutionized the symphony and planted the seed of the pop song, but an eternal masterwork of the supreme human art: making meaning out of chaos, beauty out of sorrow.

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After a bit of soul searching with regards to the future of the website, I’ve decided to open source the code for marginalia.nu, all of its services, including the search engine, encyclopedia, memex, etc.

A motivating factor is the search engine has sort of grown to a scale where it’s becoming increasingly difficult to productively work on as a personal solo project. It needs more structure. What’s kept me from open sourcing it so far has also been the need for more structure. The needs of the marginalia project, and the needs of an open source project have effectively aligned.

So fuck it. Let’s make Marginalia Search an open source search engine.

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Like every other machine, satellites do not last forever. Whether their job is to observe weather, measure greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, or point away from Earth to study the stars, eventually all satellites grow old, wear out, and die, just like old washing machines and vacuum cleaners

So what happens when a trusty satellite’s time has come? These days there are two choices, depending on how high the satellite is. For the closer satellites, engineers will use its last bit of fuel to slow it down. That way, it will fall out of orbit and burn up in the atmosphere.

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